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Beware: Those who save passwords on your browser


Frankfurt: Never store unencrypted passwords on a computer's browser. Doing so makes it too easy for hackers to access the data with tools like Trojans and then access private accounts, warns German computer magazine c't.

The magazine recommends that people who insist on storing passwords on a browser at least use some kind of master password, which means that all stored access data is safely encrypted. However,
that option is only available with Firefox and Opera. To access this function in Mozilla's Firefox, users must go to Extras/Settings/Security and then click the option to "use a master password." Opera automatically asks the first time a password is stored if users wouldn't rather set up a master password.

Many computer users do not adequately protect their accounts. The most popular passwords include "123456" or "Password" - both of which are incredibly easy for cyber criminals to figure out. Worse, one password often tends to provide access to multiple accounts.

C't advises using passwords with at least eight characters and to make each password unique to a particular website. Citibank is committed to provide a safe and secure online banking experience.
Check out the various initiatives that Citibank has adopted to safeguard your online banking sessions. Also explore how you can remain safe by adopting simple safety measures.

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