Skip to main content

Microsoft Sues Barnes & Noble Over Android Patent Issues

Microsoft has announced that it has filed a lawsuit against Barnes & Noble for patent infringement related to functionality present in its Android-based Nook e-reader. Microsoft is also taking legal action against Foxconn and Inventec for their roles in manufacturing the Nook.
At the heart of the issue are patents that Microsoft claims it owns for certain aspects of the Android user experience. The technology titan specifically mentioned “natural ways of interacting with devices by tabbing through various screens to find the information they need, surfing the Web more quickly, and interacting with documents and e-books” as three examples of functionality that Microsoft has patented.
Instead of suing every Android device maker though, Microsoft typically lets them sign a patent licensing agreement. Microsoft and HTC entered a licensing deal last year that covers Android devices. In return for the patent license, HTC agreed to pay Microsoft royalty fees on a yearly basis.
The Barnes & Noble Nook e-reader utilizes a custom version of Android for its operating system and partners with Foxconn and Inventec to build the device. Barnes & Noble, Foxconn and Inventec haven’t signed patent licensing deals with Microsoft though, and apparently negotiations have hit a brick wall.
“We have tried for over a year to reach licensing agreements with Barnes & Noble, Foxconn and Inventec,” Microsoft Corporate Vice President Horacio Gutierrez said. “Their refusals to take licenses leave us no choice but to bring legal action to defend our innovations and fulfill our responsibility to our customers, partners, and shareholders to safeguard the billions of dollars we invest each year to bring great software products and services to market.”
This is not the first time Microsoft has sued a device manufacturer over Android. Last October, Microsoft sued Motorola over some of the enhancements it has made to the Android platform.


Popular posts from this blog

Top 5 Women Who Impacted Technology in 2010

Katie Stanton, International Strategist for Twitter Katie Stanton has impressively long names of companies in her resume. They include the White House, Google Inc, and her latest addition is Twitter. Her remit is working on Twitter’s international strategy and her experience in social media will be a key asset to the company. Katie has a history of working in technology, and her knowledge of departmental laws will help Twitter work alongside government agencies, as she’ll be spearheading the free information approach, especially after the Wikileaks incident. Stanton has been a key player in the techsphere for some time, and this extends to her private life. Following the Haiti disaster she worked with a group of engineers to create a free texting service to help those in need and she is constantly in demand as an expert in both social media and government policy.
Caterina Fake, Co-Founder of Flickr and Hunch Despite having a surname which sounds like a pseudonym for a spy (it’…

AT&T MiFi 2372 review

In the week or so that I have been testing the AT&T MiFi 2372 by Novatel Wireless, it has already saved no less than three lives. First, it saved my cable guy’s life. You see, Time Warner Cable provides the worst home Internet service I have ever experienced. I can’t even think of a close second. If providing terrible home Internet service was a sport, Time Warner Cable would be on its tenth consecutive undefeated season. Forget the fact that my upload speed is capped at 60Kbps and I’m lucky if I can get half that — it has been months since I’ve gone through a full day without at least one service interruption. Months. Unfortunately, Time Warner Cable has an exclusive contract with my building so I have no choice but to endure its abysmal service. Last week, as a Time Warner Cable technician entered my home for the sixth time in two months, I realized that this certainly would have spelled serious trouble had it not been for my trusty new back up device. Before the Mi…

facebook vs google+